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Mazu Temples

Mazu is the Chinese Sea Goddness. Lin Moniang was born on 23 March 960. She was from a fishing village in Meizhou Island in Putian County of present day Fujian Province. The area was under the Min Kingdom at the time. Lin Moniang had an ability to predict the weather and advised sailors and fishermen of impending bad weather. She rescued seamen caught in bad weather, help the poor and treat the sick. When she passed away in 987, people built a temple and started to worship her and pray for safety. Mazu's tomb is believed to be at the Palace of Heavenly Empress in Matsu Village, Lienchiang County. The practise started to spread along China's coast. Mazu Temples were also built by overseas Chinese to thank Mazu for safe journey.

Ming Dynasty's Admiral Zheng He credited Mazu for protecting his fleet during one of the journey.

Zheng Chenggong or Koxinga credited Mazu for her protection of his troops to sail to Taiwan to defeat the Dutch at Tainan and drove them out of Taiwan.

During the Qing Dynasty, people believed Mazu protected General Shi Lang's troops to bring Taiwan under the Qing Dynasty's control and Qing Dynasty's 1884 victory against the French at Tamsui district.

During the WWII, Mazu was believed to have protected the people in Taiwan during the bombing attacks.



In these cases, Mazu Temples were built to thank Mazu. Similiarly, people pray for safety before their journey to foreign land and built Mazu Temples to thank Mazu and to continue pray for safety. As a result, the Mazu Temples started to spread around the world. The main entrance of the Mazu Temple faces the sea.

It is estimated that there are about 5000 Mazu Temples around the world. Chinese Clan Associations overseas also has Mazu temples in their premise and they are included in this list.

There are several names for the Mazu Temples due to the titles conferred or popular names to address her among local communities.



Hong Kong used to have many fishing communities and they built Tin Hau Temples to seek Mazu's protection and blessings. Today, there are more than 100 Tin Hau Temples around Hong Kong and the largest group by temple types.

Tianfei or Princess of Heaven is an official title conferred to Mazu by the Yuan Dynasty in 1281.

Tianhou or Queen or Empress of Heaven is an official title conferred to Mazu by the Qing Dynasty in 1683.

Tin Hau is the cantonese version of Tianhou and commonly used in Hong Kong. The chinese character remains the same.



Below is the list of 105 Mazu Temples, 83 Temples in 9 Provinces of China and 22 Temples in 3 countries around the world. The list is limited to temples or halls delicated to Goddness Mazu or the main deity is Goddness Mazu.

Key Matsu Temples:
East China:
North China:
East China:
Northeast China:
Central China:
South China:
Southwest China:
Northwest China:
North Asia:
Southeast Asia:

Fujian Province

Region:
East China

Meizhou Island Mazu Temple

This is the first Mazu Temple built in 987 in Goddess Mazu's Hometown.

City: Putian City

Prefecture: Putian

Province: Fujian

Meizhou Island Mazu Temple Complex

Wenfeng Gong

Wenfeng Gong is also known as Wenfeng Tianhou Gong. It was built in 1354 in Putian City.

City: Putian City

Prefecture: Putian

Province: Fujian

Fuzhou Tianhou Temple

Fuzhou Tianhou Temple was built during the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368) and had a major renovation during the Qing Dynasty.

City: Fuzhou City Gulou District

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Chaozong Palace

The temple was first built in 1662 and located in the area formerly called Yushapo which has the only port designated by the Qing Dynasty governemnt for sailing to Taiwan. The governemnt officials, saliors and merchants will seek Mazu' blessing in this temple before sailing.

City: Xiamen City

Prefecture: Xiamen City Siming District

Province: Fujian

Xichan Temple Tianhou Temple

The Tianhou Temple was built in the temple ground in the late 1800s in respsone to request from some overseas Chinese who had donated for the repair of the temple.

City: Fuzhou City

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Gutian Guild House Tianhou Temple

The Guild House and Temple was built in 1915 by merchants from Gutian.

City: Fuzhou City Taijiang District

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Pinghai Tianhou Temple

This Tianhou Temple was first in 999. It's one of the earliest Tianhou Temple and the first to branch off from the first Mazu Temple.

City: Putian City Xiuyu District

Prefecture: Putian

Province: Fujian

Fengting Tianhou Temple

This Tianhou Temple was first built during the Northern Song Dynasty (1098-1100). It's one of the earliest Tianhou Temple.

City: Putian City Xianyou County

Prefecture: Putian

Province: Fujian

Baihu Shunji Temple

This Tianhou Temple was first built in 1160. It's one of the earliest Tianhou Temple and once known as the three Tianfei Temples in the Southern Song Dynasty. It is located in Yuhu Park along Zhenhai Street.

City: Putian City Licheng District

Prefecture: Putian

Province: Fujian

Xianying Palace Tianhou Temple

This Temple was first built in 1138. The Temple complex has Hall of Goddess of Mercy and Hall of Mazu Goddess. The temple was rediscovered in 1992. Over 50 statues including the earliest statue of Zheng He was found here. A Major Historical and Cultural Site Protected at the National Level The current Temple has new Halls for Goddess of Mercy and Hall of Mazu Goddess and access to the discovered ancient temple and artifacts.

City: Fuzhou City Changle District

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Quanzhou Tianhou Temple

Quanzhou Tianhou Temple was first built in 1196. This is the first Mazu Temple recognised as A Major Historical and Cultural Site Protected at the National Level.

City: Quanzhou City

Prefecture: Quanzhou

Province: Fujian

Xiguan Tianhou Temple

This Tianhou Temple was built by Ming Dynasty's Admiral Zheng He. It was relocated to the current site in 1761 and had a major repair in 1815.

City: Fuzhou City Changle District

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Shipping Culture Tianhou Temple

The temple was first built in 1868 and reconstructed in 2008.

City: Fuzhou City Mawei District

Prefecture: Fuzhou

Province: Fujian

Chaotian Temple

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City: Xiamen City Huli District

Prefecture: Xiamen

Province: Fujian

Beijing Municipality

Region:
North China

Tongsha Tianhou Temple

City: Beijing City Haidian District

Municipality: Beijing

Tianjin Municipality

Region:
North China

Tianfei Palace Site

This is the site of a Tianfei Palace built in the Yuan Dynasty.

City: Tianjin City Hedong District

Province: Tianjin

Tianhuo Gong Temple

The temple was first built in 1326 as Tianfei Palace. It is the oldest building in Tianjin city. The temple named was changed to Tianhuo Temple in 1684.

City: Tianjin City Nankai District

Municipality: Tianjin

Shanghai Municipality

Region:
East China

Gaoqiao Tianhou Palace

The founding of the temple is unknown. During the Ming Dyansty, it's beleived Admiral Zheng Ge came to pray for safe voyage during his fourth expedition. Thr temple was destroyed by Japanese pirates in 1556 and rebuilt in 2016.

City: Shanghai City Pudong District

Province: Shanghai

Shanghai Tianhou Temple

The original temple at the confluence of Huangpu and Suzhou River was authorised by the Qing Dynasty goverment and built in 1884. It became the largest temple in the city and goverment officials pray at the temple before sailing overseas. In 1929, the temple was used as a school before the temple reopening in 1938. In 1946, the temple site became a school again.

In 1978, the main hall of the temple was relocated to Fangtai Park as a tea house till 2000 when it opens as a Tianhou temple.

The other structures including the stage remains on the site till 2006 when they were removed for preservation. In 2016, the preservation strucutres where used to built the current temple which opened in 2022.

City: Shanghai City Jingan District

Municipality: Shanghai

Fangtai Park Tianhou Temple

The original temple at the confluence of Huangpu and Suzhou River was authorised by the Qing Dynasty goverment and built in 1884. It became the largest temple in the city and goverment officials pray at the temple before sailing overseas. In 1929, the temple was used as a school before the temple reopening in 1938. In 1946, the temple site became a school again.

In 1978, the main hall of the temple was relocated to Fangtai Park as a tea house till 2000 when it opens as a Tianhou temple.

The other structures including the stage remains on the site till 2006 when they were removed for preservation. In 2016, the preservation strucutres where used to built the current temple which opened in 2022.

City: Shanghai City Songjiang District

Municipality: Shanghai

Shandong Province

Region:
East China

Taierzhuang Ancient City Tianhou Temple, Taierzhuang District

The orginal Tianhou Temple was built during the Qing Dynasty Emperor Yongzhen period when Taierzhuang was a major commerical hub along the Grand Canal. The entire city and the temple was completely destroyed during the 1938 War of Resistance against Japanese Agression. The current temple was constructed in 2012 as part of the Taierzhuang Cultural Heritage Park.

City: Zaozhuang City Taierzhuang District

Province: Shandong

Changdao Xiangying Palace

The Mazu Temple was built in 1122. It is one of the earliest Mazu Temple.

City: Penglai City

Prefecture: Yantai

Province: Shandong

Penglai Mazu Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in 1122. It is one of the earliest Mazu Temple.

City: Penglai City

Prefecture: Yantai

Province: Shandong

Qingdao Mazu Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in 1476 and the oldest in the city.

City: Qingdao City Shinan District

Province: Shandong

Jiangsu Province

Region:
East China

Nanjing Tianfei Palace

This Tianfei Palace or Princess of Heavan Palace was built in 1407 during the Ming Dynasty to honour Goddness Mazu for blessing Admiral Zhenghe after his successful first voyage. for the next 6 voyages, Admiral Zhenghe seek Goddness Mazu's blessing before each sailing and came back to thank her after each return.

City: Nanjing City

Prefecture: Nanjing City Gulou District

Province: Jiangsu

Jinling Tianfei Palace

This Tianfei Palace or Princess of Heavan Palace was built in 1416 during the Ming Dynasty to honour Goddness Mazu after Admiral Zhenghe returned from his 4th voyage. The temple was damaged during wartime in 1853 and 1937. The current temple was rebuilt in 2005 to commemorate the 600th anniversary of Admiral Zhenghe's voyages.

City: Nanjing City Gulou District

Prefecture: Nanjing

Province: Jiangsu

Treasure Ship Ruins Park Tianfei Ancient Temple

Taiwan

Region:
East China

Anping Matsu Temple

The Temple was built in 1668 soon after Koxinga retook Taiwan from the Dutch in 1668. It houses one of the three Mazu statue Kongxinga brought from Meihou China and has tablets from Emperor Guangxu. Several miracles around the temple were believed to be performed by Goddness Mazu including leading the initial settlers of Anping, protection from WWII bombing, producing miraculous sweat and protecting her statue in the 1990 temple fire.

City: Tainan City

Province: Taiwan

Tianhou Temple

This is the first Tianhou or Mazu Temple built in Kaohsiung 1673.

City: Kaohsiung City Cijin District

Province: Taiwan

Grand Matsu Temple

The Grand Mazu Temple was converted from the former Palace of Southern Ming Prince in 1684 after the Qing Dynasty conquest of Taiwan. It is the first Temple to use the "Empress of Heaven" that Qing Dynasty Emperor had newly granted Goddness Mau and the first built by a government in Taiwan. The "Princess of Heaven" title was previously used in earlier temples.

City: Tainan City

Province: Taiwan

Ciyou Temple



The temple was founded in 1753 by a monk who raised money for the temple with a group of Mazu devotees.

Nearest Metro station: Songshan Station

City: Taipei City Songshan District

Province: Taiwan

Tianhou Temple,

City: Kaohsiung City Cijin District

Province: Taiwan

Penghu Mazu Temple

Penghu Mazu Temple is beleived to be the earliest Mazu temple in Taiwan. It is believed to be founded in 1281 by Mongol Dynasty Emperor. In 1280, Mongol Dynasty sent a naval force to attack Japan. They were caught in the typhoon and sailors dreamt of Goddness Mazu helping them while drafting at sea and eventually landed in Penghu.

City: Penghu County

Province: Taiwan

Lukang Mazu Temple

Lukang Mazu Temple was believed to be founded in 1590. The temple at the current site was built in 1725. The temple is famous for its carved stones and wooen beams. The temple has 3 plaques given by the Qing Emperors.

City: Changhua County

Province: Taiwan

Longfeng Temple

Longfeng Temple was founded in 1611. It is one of the oldest temple in the county.

City: Kinmen County Jinsha Township

Province: Taiwan

Guangfu Temple

Guangfu Temple was established in 1644 by a monk Shu Bi who brought a statue of Mazu from Meihou, China. Beigang Chaotian Temple is the ancestral temple for many other Mazu Temples in Taiwan and is honored with an annual pilgrimage by the new temples' worshippers.

City: Yunlin County Xilou Township

Province: Taiwan

Orthodox Luermen Mazu Temple

Orthodox Luermen Mazu Temple is the world largest Mazu Temple. It was built in 1661 by Koxinga in honor of Goddness Mazu. He credited Goddness Mau for blessing him with a safe landing when the sea level rose for his fleet to overcome the obstacles place by the Dutch.

City: Tainan County

Province: Taiwan

Cijin Tianhou Temple

Cijin Tianhou Temple opened in 1673 and the first Mazu Temple in Kaohsung City.

City: Kaohsung City Cijin District

Province: Taiwan

Fuan Temple

Fuan Temple was founded in 1677.

City: Changhua County Shengang Township

Province: Taiwan

Peitian Temple

Peitian Temple opened in 1682.

City: Jiayi County Puzi City

Province: Taiwan

Gangkou Temple

Gangkou Temple opened in 1684 by a settler Lin Kai from Meizhou Island.

City: Jiayi County Dongshi Township

Province: Taiwan

Xingan Temple

Xingan Temple is the first Mazu Temple built in Lukang. It was built in 1684 by immigrants from Xinghua China who brought along Mazu and built the temple. Xingan measn "Prosperous and safe" in Chinese.

City: Changhua County

Province: Taiwan

Cihyu Temple

Cihyu Temple was founded in 1685.

City: Miaoli County Zhunan Township

Province: Taiwan

Cide Temple

Cide Temple opened in 1687.

City: Kaohsiung City Cijin District

Province: Taiwan

Beigang Chaotian Temple

Beigang Chaotian Temple was established in 1694 by a monk Shu Bi who brought a statue of Mazu from Meihou, China. Beigang Chaotian Temple is the ancestral temple for many other Mazu Temples in Taiwan and is honored with an annual pilgrimage by the new temples' worshippers.

City: Yunlin County

Province: Taiwan

Guandu Temple

The temple was opened in 1712.

City: Taipei City Beitou District

Province: Taiwan

Wanhe Temple

Wanhe Temple opened in 1726.

City: Nantun District, Taichung City

Province: Taiwan

Dajia Jenn Lann Temple

Dajia Jenn Lann Temple is also known as the Mazu Temple opened in 1730.

City: Dajia District, Taichung City

Province: Taiwan

Haotian Temple

Haotian Temple was founded in 1738 by Hakka communbity in Chencuozhuang village. It was relocated to present site in 1856.

City: Wuqi District, Taichung City

Province: Taiwan

Nanyao Temple

Nanyao Temple was founded in 1738.

City: Changhua County Nanyao Village

Province: Taiwan

Gongfang Temple

The Temple opened in 1742.

City: Yunlin County Mailiao Township

Province: Taiwan

Ximending Mazu Temple

The Temple was built in 1746 with funds from Zhanghou and Quanzhou immigrant merchants.

City: Taipei City Wanhua District

Province: Taiwan

Heping Island Mazu Temple

The Temple was first built in 1747. The temple at the current site was built in 1949. This temple is believed to Keelung's first Mazu Temple and the oldest in North Taiwan.

City: Keelung City Zhongzheng District

Province: Taiwan

Tianmen Temple

Tianmen Temple was believed to be founded in 1755.

City: Changhua County Shetou Township

Province: Taiwan

Tzu Yu Temple



The temple was founded in 1757 by immigrants from Quanhou. The Mazu statue was from a Monk Heng Zhen. The temple was the first in Taiwan which has a copy of a Mazu statue that was consecrated and enshired in mainland China.

City: Taipei City Songshan District

Province: Taiwan

Leh Cherng Temple

Leh Cherng Temple at the current site was built in 1791. The original temple was constructed during the Qing Dynasty Qianlong era when the construction was authorised by the Meichou Matsu Temple.

City: Taichung City

Province: Taiwan

Ande Temple

Ande Temple was founded in 1801.

City: Keelung City Nuannuan District

Province: Taiwan

Dianan Temple

Dianan Temple was founded in 1806.

City: Changhua County Beidou Township

Province: Taiwan

Fengtian Temple

Fengtian Temple was founded in 1811 by Xingang community to house relics from another Tianhou Temple in the area that was destroyed by flooding. .

City: Jiayi County Xingang Township

Province: Taiwan

Fuhai Temple

Fuhai Temple was founded in 1812.

City: Changhua County Fangyuan Township

Province: Taiwan

Tianhou Temple



The temple opened in 1826 and has the world's 3rd tallest Mazu statue.

City: Taoyuan City Xinwu District

Province: Taiwan

Shuntian Temple

Cihyu Temple was founded in 1856.

City: Miaoli County Yuanli Township

Province: Taiwan

Gongtian Temple

Gongtian Temple was founded in 1863.

City: Miaoli County Tongxiao Township

Province: Taiwan

Zhejiang Province

Region:
East China

Tiangong Temple

County: County

Prefecture:

Province: Zhejiang

Guangdong Province

Region:
South China

Chiwan Tianhou Temple

Chiwan Tianhou Temple was believed to be built to offer protection to Admiral Zheng He's fleet.

Nearest Metro Station: Taoyuan station, Line 1 Luobao Line, Walking distance

City: Shenzhen City Nanshan District

Prefecture: Shenzhen

Province: Guangdong Province

Fengshan Ancestor Temple

Fengshan Ancestor Temple is also known as Fengshan Mazu Temple. The temple was built in 1636 and expanded in 1742. The temple witnessed the growth of the Shanwei habour. It is within the Fengshan Mazu Temple Tourist area.

City:Shanwei City

Prefecture:Shanwei

Province: Guangdong Province

Nansha Tianhou Palace

The temple was first built in the Ming dynasty as Tianfei Temple. The current temple was rebuilt in 1996.

Nearest subway station: Jinzhou Station, Line 4.

City: Guangzhou City Nansha District

Prefecture: Guangzhou

Province: Guangdong Province

Fengshan Tianhou Pavilion

This temple was constructed in 1993. It is within the Fengshan Mazu Temple Tourist area.

City:Shanwei City

Prefecture:Shanwei

Province: Guangdong Province

Guishan Island Mazu Temple

The temple has a history of 200 to 300 years. It's the largest Mazu temple in the Wanshan Archipelgo.

City: Zhuhai City Xiangzhou District

Prefecture: Zhuhai

Province: Guangdong Province

Shansha Tianhou Temple

The village temple for Shansah village was founded during the Ming Dynasty. The current temple design is based on Qing Dynasty architectural. Nearby Shansha Subway station.

City: Shenzhen City Futian District

Prefecture: Shenzhen

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Zhanjiang

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Maoming

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Yangjiang

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Jiangmen

Province: Guangdong Province

Chaobian Tianhou Temple

The temple was built in 1883.

City:Zhongshan City

Prefecture: Zhongshan

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Dongguang

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Huizhou

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Shantou

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Chaozhou

Province: Guangdong Province

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City:Zhanjiang City District

Prefecture:Foshan

Province: Guangdong Province

Tangkeng Tianhou Ancient Temple

The temple was built in Ming Dynasty. It is the oldest existing Mazu Temple in Guangzhou and part of the Maritime Silkroad heritage.

City:Guangzhou City Nansha District

Prefecture: Guangzhou

Province: Guangdong Province

Guangxi Province

Region:
South China

Dianjian Tiangong Temple

Dianjian Tiangong Temple was built in 1762. The current temple was built in 2012.

City: Beihai City

Province: Guangxi

Dijiao Mazu Temple

City: Beihai City

Province: Guangxi

Shengnong Tiangong Temple

City: Beihai City

Province: Guangxi

Waisha Longmu Tianhou Temple

City: Beihai City

Province: Guangxi

China Mazu White House Temple of Zhongshun and Tianhou Temple

City: Beihai City Haicheng District

Province: Guangxi

Hainan Province

Region:
South China

Baishamen Tianhou Temple

This is the first Mazu Temple in Hainan Province. It was built by merchants from Fujian Province about 800 years ago.

City: Haikou City Meilan District

Province: Hainan Province

Haikou Tianhou Temple

This Mazu Temple was founded during the Yuan Dynasty about 700 years ago. It is the largest Mazu Temple in Hainan Province.

City: Haikou City Meilan District

Province: Hainan Province

Hunan Province

Region:
Central China

Zhijiang Tiangong Temple

Zhijiang Tiangong Temple was built in 1728 and is the largest in central China.

County: Zhijiang Dong Autonomous County

Prefecture: Huaihua

Province: Hunan

Guizhou Province

Region:
Central China

Jiuzhou Tiangong Temple

Jiuzhou Tiangong Temple was built in 1837 as part of Fujian Clan Association by Fujian merchants in Jiuzhou. It was destroyed in 1855 and rebuilt in 1901. The temple was used as a temporary hospital during the Long March.

A National Historical and Cultural Site.

County: Jiuzhou Town Huangping County

Prefecture: Qiandongnan Autonomous Prefecture

Province: Guizhou

Hong Kong SAR

Region:
South China

Joss House Bay Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hou Temple was built in 1266. It is the most scared, oldest and largest Tin Hou Temple in Hong Kong.The temple is a Grade I Historic Building.

District: Sai Kung District.

Hau Kok Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hou Temple was built in 1637 by fishermen using Tuen Mun as the hub for waterway transport. The temple used to face the sea till the land reclamation. During the Ming Dynasty, the To Clan running the salt business contributed to the Temple's expansion. The villagers living in the nearby walled villages also contributed to the renovations for the temple.

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Walking distance from MTR.

Tai O Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple in San Tsuen Tai O was first built in 1644.

District: Island District

Fung Chi Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built around 1684 based on the date on the bronze bell in the temple and is a Grade I Historic Building. The Temple is located in Wang Chau area.

District: Yuen Long District

Tai Tseng Wai Tin Hau Ancient Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built in 1688. It is located in Wang Chau area

District: Yuen Long District

Tai Po Kau Hui Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was first built before 1691. It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Tai Po District

Nearest MTR: Tai Wo MTR, Public transport from MTR required.

Tung Tau Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was founded in 1692 based on the date of the bell. It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Yuen Long District

Nearest MTR: Yuan Long MTR Station. Walking distance from MTR.

Tsuen Wan Tin Hau Temple

Tsuen Wan Town's Tin Hau Temple near the Sam Tung Uk Museum. This Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1722. It was relocated to this site in 1983. This of the a few Tin Hau Temples in Hong Kong with an archway. It is a Grade II Historic Building.

District: Tsuen Wan District

Tai Hang Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built between 1662 - 1722 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Tai Po District

Ha Wai Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built in 1737. It is a Grade II Historic Building.

District: Tai Po District

Leung Shuen Wan Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built around 1741 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Sai Kung District

Tsing Yi Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1741 and relocated to current site in 1983. It is famous around the district as the local residents believed the temple had protected from them from the bombing during WWII.

District: Kwai Tsing District

Nearest MTR: Tsing Yi MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR to the Temple.

Causeway Bay Tin Hau Ancient Temple

The original temple can be traced back to 1747. The current temple dates back to 1868. It was built by a Hakka Tai family after they found an incense burner floating in the sea. The temple has a bell casted in 1747.

District: Eastern District.

A Declared Monument of Hong Kong.

Lei Yue Mun Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was first built in 1753 and is a Grade III Historic building.

District: Kwun Tong District

Nearest MTR: Yau Tong MTR Station. Walking distance from MTR.

Ping Yuen Tin Hau Ancient Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1756 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: North District

Nearest MTR: Fangling MTR Station. Bus from MTR.

Sai Ho Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple is on Kat O Island. This Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1763 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: North District

Sha Tau Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built in 1765. It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: North District

Nearest MTR: .

Stanley Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1767 at this site with good Fengshui. The temple has a tiger skin from one of the last tiger in Stanley in the 1940s. During WWII, two bombs hit the temple during the Japanese attack did not explore and the people sheltering in the temple were miraculously unharmed.

District: Southern District.

Cheung Chau Island Pak She Tin Hau Temple

One of the four Tin Hau Temples on the island. The Pak She Tin Hou Temple was built around 1767. It is a Grade II Historic building. High speed ferry services from Central Pier takes 35 minutes to reach the island.

District: Islands District

Fong Ma Po Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built in 1768 or around 1771. It is a Grade II Historic Building.

District: Tai Po District

Kat Hing Back Street Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple in Tai O was built in 1772 and is a Grade III Historic Buidling.

District: Island District

Cheung Chau Island Tai Shek Tin Hau Temple

There are four Tin Hou Temples on the island. The Tai Shek Tin Hou Temple was built in 1772 and is a Grade II Historic Building. High speed ferry services from Central Pier takes 35 minutes to reach the island.

District: Islands District

Tai Shu Ha Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built in 1786 and is a Grade II Historic Building.

District: Yuen Long District

Peng Chau Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built in 1792 and is a Grade II Historic Building.

District: Islands District

Ha Kwai Chung Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was founded in 1796 by villagers. The Temple was relocated to the current location in 1960.

District: Kwai Tsing District

Nearest MTR: Kwai Fong MTR Station. Walking distance from MTR.

Fan Lau Miu Wan Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple was believed to be built in 1820 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Islands District.

Cheung Chau Island Sai Wan Tin Hau Temple

The temple is 200 years old and has a bronze bell dated to the Qing Dynasty Qianlong era (1736-1796). It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Islands District

Lok Fu Tin Hau Temple

The temple was first built during the Qing Dynasty Jiaqing reign (1796-1820). The temple was rebuilt in the 1950s.

District: Wong Tai Sin District

Nearest MTR: Lok Fu MTR Station. The Temple is walking distance from MTR.

Chek Lap Kok New Village Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple in Lantau Island was built in 1823 and is a Grade II Historic Buidling.

District: Island District

Hang Hau Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built around 1840 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Sai Kung District

Nearest MTR: Hang Hau MTR Station. Walking distance from MTR.

Shau Kei Wan Tin Hau Temple

The residents in the area used to be fishermen. The Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1845 and rebuilt in 1873 for fishermen to pray for their safety at sea.

District: Eastern District.

Aberdeen Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple was first built in 1845 and rebuilt in 1851 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Southern District.

Cha Kwo Ling Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built during the reign of Daoguan (1821-1850) of the Qing Dynasty and is a Grade III historic building.

District: Kwun Tong District

Nearest MTR: Lam Tin MTR Station. Requires public transporrt from MTR station.

Kap Shui Mun Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple is located along Ma Wan Main Street. It is a Grade III Historic Building and was renovated in 1860.

District: Tsuen Wan District

Yau Ma Tei Tin Hau Temple Complex Tin Hau Temple

The Temple complex houses several temples. The Tin Hou Temple was built in 1864 and a Declared Monument of Hong Kong.

District: Yau Tsim Mong District.

Nearest MTR Station: Jordan MTR Station, 8 mins walk

Sok Kwu Wan Tin Hau Temple

The temple is located in Sok Kwu Wan Village in Lamma Island was built in 1826. The Temple displayed a specimen of an Oarfish caught by local fisherman. Ferry services from Central Pier takes 35 minutes to reach the island.

District: Islands District

Yung Shue Wan Tin Hau Temple

The original temple can be traced back to 1876. The Temple in Lamma Isand has two westerns lions at the entrance after the tradtional Chinese Lions were damaged in the 1960s. It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Islands District.

To Kwa Wan Tin Hau Temple and Lung Mo Temple

The temple complex has two Temples. The Tin Hou Temple was built in 1885 and is a Grade III Historic Building while the Lung Mo Temple is on the right.

District: Kowloon City District. Requires public transport from MTR to the Temple.

Tsing Lung Tau Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hou Temple was built in 1889.

District: Tsuen Wan District.

Nearest MTR: Tsuen Wan West MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Shek O Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hou Temple was believed to be built before 1891 based on dates on some historic items in the temple. It is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Southern District. Requires public transport from MTR to the Temple.

Tung Shan Old Temple

The Temple was built in 1894 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Yuen Long District

Kam Tin Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built in the 1800s and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Yuen Long District. Requires public transport from Kam Sheung MTR Station.

Sha Kong Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built in the 1800s and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: Yuen Long District

Sai Kung Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built around 1910-1920s and is a Grade II historic building.

District: Sai Kung District

Sham Shui Po Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was built in 1901 and is a Grade III historic building.

District: Sham Shui Po District

Nearest MTR: Sham Shui Po MTR Station.

Wong Nai Chung Tin Hau Temple

The temple was relocated to No 9 Blue Pool Road Happy Valley in 1901.

District: Wan Chai District

Nearest MTR: Chai Wan MTR Station. Public transport from MTR required.

Lung Yeuk Tau Heritage Trail Lung Yeuk Tau Tin Hau Temple

The founding date of the temple is unknown but it has two bronze bells casted in 1695 and 1700. The temple was restored in 1913 and 1981. A declared Monument of Hong Kong.

District: North District

Muk Wu Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple was built around 1912-13 and is a Grade III Historic Building.

District: North District

So Kwun Wat Tin Hau Temple in Hong Kong Gold Coast

The founding date of the temple is unknown but it had exist in the early period of Qing Dynasty. It used to face the sea until 1994 when the area was developed into a residential area. During the early Qing Dynasty, the villagers were banned from the sea due to the threat from Zheng Chenggong. When the villagers were allowed to return, they found the temple undamaged and believed Goddness Mazu had protected it.

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Sam Chau Ma Temple

The Tin Hou Temple was built during the late period of Qing Dynasty.

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Nam Shue Wan Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple was originally built in 1920 and rebuilt in 1972. The Mazu statue in the temple was moved to Peng Chau islands during WWII when Japan occpied Hong Kong.

District: Islands District

Nearest MTR: Tung Chung MTR, Public transport from MTR required. Walking distance from Discovery Bay

Tai Lam Chung Tin Hau Temple

The Temple was first built in 1924 and located in the village of the same name. The current temple was rebuilt in 2006.

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Floating Tin Hau Temple, Causeway Bay Typhoon Shelter

The temple on the Chinese Junk was founded during WWII. The original temple destroyed by the Japanese troops and fishermen contributed money to start the temple on the Chinese Junk. The floating temple has been based here since 1950 and there are now plans to built a temple on land.

District: Wan Chai District

Lok Kang Po Tin Hau Ancient Temple

The Tin Hau Temple is at current site since 1967.

District: Eastern District

Nearest MTR: Chai Wan MTR, Walking distance from MTR station

Hoi Kwok Tin Hau Shing Mo Temple

The temple was founded in 1967 and relocated to current site in 2008. In 1961, a Yu family of 7 sailed from Shanwei to Hong Kong. They had the Goddness Mazu on the boat for protection. After landing in Hong Kong, they built a shrine which eventually became the temple in 1967.

District: Kwun Tong District

Nearest MTR: Kwun Tong MTR Station. Public transport from MTR required.

Sia Sau Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

This village temple was built in 1976 and relocated here in 1982.

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Chai Wan Tin Hau Temple

District: Wan Chai District

Nearest MTR: Causeway Bay MTR Station. Public transport from MTR required.

Tai Wo Hau Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple is opposite Kwai Chung Market along Tai Wo Hau Road.

District: Kwai Tsing District

Nearest MTR: Kwai Hing MTR Station. The Temple is walking distance from MTR.

Cheung Chau Island Nam Wan Tin Hau Temple

District: Islands District

Sam Kung Temple Complex Tin Hau Temple

The Tin Hau Temple is one of three temples in the Temple complex.

District: Tai Po District

Nearest MTR: Tai Po Market MTR, Public transport from MTR required.

Pak Wan Tin Hau Temple

This Tin Hau Temple is at the northern beach near the pier. It was believed to be built by local pirate Cheung Po Tsai.

District: Tsuen Wan District

Mai Po Lung Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

District: Yuen Long District

Wai Loi Tsuen Tin Hau Temple

District: North District

Nearest MTR: Sheung Shui MTR, Walking distance from MTR

So Kwun Wat New Village Tin Hau Ancient Temple

District: Tuen Mun District.

Nearest MTR: Tuen Mun MTR Station. Requires public transport from MTR.

Macao SAR

Province:
Macao SAR
Region:
South China

A-Ma Temple

Tin Hau Temple Coloane

The Tin Hau Temple is believed to be built in 1667 while the iron bell is dated to 1763. The temple is a monument of Macao.

Tin Hau Temple Cheok Ka Village Taipa

This Tin Hau Temple was built between 1662- 1723. The temples are monuments of Macao.

Tin Hau Temple Taipa

This Tin Hau Temple was built around 1785. It houses many historical relics including a bell casted in 1785 during the reign of Emperor Qianlong. The Temple is a monument of Macao.

Tin Hau Temple Rua dos Pescadores

The Tin Hau Temple was built in 1865 and restored in 1987. The temple is a monument of Macao.

Singapore

Region:
Southeast Asia

Thian Hock Keng Temple

The temple name means Temple of Heavenly Blessings in hokkien dialect. It was founded in 1839.

In the 19th century, sailing between China and southeast Asia increases due to trade and Chinese immigrants mainly from the Guangdong and Fujian Provinces of China who seek work in Southeast Asia. The immigrants and saliors had to sail in Chinese junks for one to two weeks to Singapore under harsh conditions. They prayed to Goddness Mazu to bless and protect them during the journey. Gradually, Mazu Temples were setup for the immigrants and sailors to thank Goddness Mazu for a safe voayage when they landed in Singapore. The Chinese community form clans to support their own dialets groups or those from the same hometown in China. The clans and community leaders started to built Mazu Temples too and the temples names are in the local dialects.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Outram

City: Singapore

Qiong Zhou Tin Hou Temple

The Tian Hou Temple was founded in 1854 together with the Singapore Hainan Clan Association and relocated to the current site in 1887. Qiong Zhou Tian Hou Temple was founded by clan members from Qiongzhou county of China's Hainan Province.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Yueh Hai Ching Temple

Temple of the Calm Cantonese Sea was built in 1895.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Hoon Hong Tian Ho Temple

The Temple was founded in 1911 at St Michael by immigrants from China's Guangxi Province. It was rebuilt by the Cantonese community in 1936 and 1958. The Joss Ash from the Temple was used for setting up Kampong San Teng Tien How Association. It was moved to this current location in 1987 and is part of the Potong Pasir Joint Temple.

This is the 75th Mazu Temple visited.

Region : North East

Planning Area: Ang Mo Kio

City: Singapore

Xing An Tian Hou Temple

The Xing An Tian Hou Temple was founded in the 1920s at 133 Queen Street for immigrants from Putian in China. It moved to this current location in 1991 together with Nanyang Putian Clan Association.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Geyland

City: Singapore

Lim See Tai Chong Soo Kiu Leong Tong

This is an ancestral temple founded in 1928 to worship the Lim family's ancestors. Goddness Mazu's surname is Lim and is considered as the Grand Aunt of the Lim clan.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Chung Shan Hoizou Association

The association was founded in 1934. The Goddness Mazu was invited from Hoizou, China.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Kampong Tengah Thian Hou Temple

The Thian Hou Temple was founded in 1930s at Jalan Kampong Tengah. It serves the Teochew villagers who are mainly fishermen. The temple was relocated to Pulau Ubin island before moving to this current location in 2001 and is part of the Sengkang Joint Temple.

Region : Northeast

Planning Area: Seng Kang

City: Singapore

Kampong San Teng Tien How Association

The Kampong San Teng Tien How Assoication was founded in the 1940 with Joss Ash from Hoon Hong Tian Haw Temple. It was moved to this current location in 1986 and is part of the Thomson Joint Temple.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Bishan

City: Singapore

Sembawang Tian Hou Temple

The Temple was founded in 1947 as Sai Ho Koo Kay Tian Ho Temple for the Lim community in Sembawang and Yishun area. The temple name was changed to the current one when it moved to this current location in 2006 and is part of the Sembawang United Temple.

Region : North

Planning Area: Sembawang

City: Singapore

Swatow Sia Mazu Temple

The Swatow Sia Mazu Temple was initially setup at Whampoa Garden before the temple was built in 1956. It moved to this current location in 1994.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Geyland

City: Singapore

Ling Ci Xing Gong Temple

The Temple was founded in 1962 with Joss Ash and Goddness Mazu statue from Ling Ci Temple in Putian, China.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Rochor

City: Singapore

Bak Sua Siah Boo Temple

The Temple was founded in 1976 at Lim Chu Kang 19th milestone with Goddness Mazu as the main deity. The name of the temple is in Teochew dialect. It was moved to this current location in 1999 and is part of the Cheng Hwa Cher Siah Temple.

Region : West

Planning Area: Bukit Panjang

City: Singapore

Zhong Tou Temple

The Temple was founded in a Teochew fishing village in Hougang. It was moved to this current location in 1985 and is part of the Tian De Temple.

Region : North East

Planning Area: Ang Mo Kio

City: Singapore

Singapore Foochow Association Tianhou Temple

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Region : Central

Planning Area: Kallang

City: Singapore

Eng Choon Clan Association

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Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Singapore Teochew Sai Ho Association Mazu Temple

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Region : Central

Planning Area: River Valley

City: Singapore

Ning Yeung Clan Association

Ning Yeung Clan Association was founded by Cho Ah Chee in 1822 to support immigrants from Taishan in Guangdong Province China. In 1819, Cho Ah Chee was a carpenter onboard S.S Indiana which sailed with Stamford Raffles from Penang and a member of the team that landed at the mouth of Rochor River to confirm the island is not under Dutch rule and planted the British flag at Forbidden Hill. Raffles awarded a piece of land to him which was used to built the first clan association in Singapore. He is one of the earliest Chinese immigrant to Singapore.

Region : Central

Planning Area: Downtown Core

City: Singapore

Malaysia

Region:
Southeast Asia

Seng Choon Keong

The Mazu Temple was established about 300 years ago during the 1720s. The Temple name means Scared Spring Palace in Hokkien dialect.

Village: Kampung Tok'kong

State: Kelantan State

Malacca Eng Choon Association

The Mazu Temple was established in 1800.

City: Malacca City

State: Malacca State

Melaka Hokkian Huay Kuan

The Mazu Temple was established in 1801 by the Malacca Hokkien Clan Association.

City: Malacca City

State: Malacca State

Melaka Hai Nan Hui Guan

The Mazu Temple was established in 1869 by the Malacca Hainan Clan Association.

City: Malacca City

State: Malacca State

Hainan Association & Mazu Temple

The Mazu Temple was established around 1866 by the Hainan community in Penang.

City: Penang City

State: Penang State

Selangor Pulau Ketam Chiau Eng Bio Thiam Houh Kong Temple

The Mazu Temple was established in 1872.

City: Pulau Ketam

State: Selangor State

Melaka Say Ho Tong Lim Kongsi

The Mazu Temple was established in 1875 by the Lin Clan.

City: Malacca City

State: Malacca State

Sarawak Kuching Tian Hou Temple

The Mazu Temple was established in 1878.

City: Kuching City

State: Sarawak State

Penang Jelutong Thian Hoo Mah Chor

The Mazu Temple was established around 1884.

City: Georgetown City

State: Penang State

Johor Kota Tinggi Tien Hoe Kung Temple

The Mazu Temple was established in 1884.

District: Kota Tinggi

State: Johor

Penang Jelutong San Hai Kong

The Mazu Temple was established around 1888.

City: Georgetown City

State: Penang State

Selangor Kuala Selangor Tian Fu Gong

The Mazu Temple was established in 1888.

City: Kuala Selangor

State: Selangor State

Skudai Tian Hou Temple

The Mazu Temple was established in 1892 and moved to the present site in 1935.

District: Skudai

State: Johor

Tian Hou Gong Temple

The Mazu Temple is located in the Chinatown of Kuala Terenganu. It was built in 1896 with construction material brought in from China. The temple was established by Hainanese settlers living along the banks of Terengganu River.

District: Kuala Terenganu

State: Terenganu

Thean Hou Temple

The Mazu Temple was established in 1989 by Hainanese in Malaysia. The Temple name means Mazu Temple in Hokkien dialect.

District: Seputeh

State: Kuala Lumpur

Japan

Region:
East Asia

Kofukuji Temple Mazu Hall

The Chinese temple founded in 1620 is the oldest and one of the most important Chinese founded temple in the city. It has a Mazu Hall where Chinese merchants used to pray for their safe sea travel.

City: Nagasaki

Prefecture: Nagasaki

Sofukuji Temple Mazu Hall

The temple was built in 1629 by Chinese monk Chaonian as the family temple for Fuzhou Chinese who settled in Nagaskai. The goddness of the sea, Mazu is enshrined in the Mazu Hall.

City: Nagasaki

Prefecture: Nagasaki

Nagasaki Former Chinese Settlement Hokkien Clan Association Tenkodo Hall

The association opened in 1868 and the Tenkodo Hall is delicated to Mazu, Goddness of the Sea.

City: Nagasaki

Prefecture: Nagasaki

Former Chinese Settlement Mazu Temple

This Mazu Temple was established in 1703.

City: Nagasaki

Prefecture: Nagasaki

Yokohama Chinatown Tianhou Temple

The temple was opened on 17 Feb 2006. It was built by the Chinatown community with donations from all over Japan.

City:Yokohama

Prefecture: Kanagawa

Shinjuku Maso Temple

The Temple opened on 13 October 2013.

City:Tokyo Shinjuku District

Prefecture: Tokyo

South Korea

Region:
Southeast Asia

Uiseondang

Uiseondang was built in 1893 in the former Chinese settlement established after the signing of the China-Korea treaty in 1882. It is a Chinese temple enshrining several deities. Mazu is enshrined in the temple as sailing betwwen South Korea and China is the main mode of travel and travellers seek Mazu's blessing for safety at sea.

City: Incheon Jung-gu

Metropolitan City: Incheon

Geoseondang

Geoseondang was setup around 1884 to serve as a religious place and to provide support the Chinese in Seoul. It enshrines several deities. Mazu is enshrined in the temple as sailing betwwen South Korea and China is the main mode of travel and travellers seek Mazu's blessing for safety at sea.

City: Seoul

Metropolitan City: Seoul

Hanshenggong

City: Busan

Metropolitan City: Busan

Indonesia

Region:
Southeast Asia

Cu An Kiong Temple

This temple was built in 1477 by a sailor Bi Nang, from Admiral Zheng He's fleet. He was allowed by the King to stay in Lasem to spread the Islam religion.

Town:Lasem Town Rembang Regency

Province: Central Java

Vihara Bahtra Sasana

The Mazu Temple was founded in the 1820s. Vihara Bahtra Sasana is the temple name in Bahasa Indonesia.

City:Bintan Island

Province: Riau Islands

Xian Ma Temple

The Mazu Temple was founded in the 1864 and the oldest in Sulawesi.

City:Makassar

Province: Southern Sulawesi

Thailand

Region:
Southeast Asia

San Chao Chet

The Mazu Temple was built in 1882 by the Cantonese.

District:Bang Rak

City:Bangkok

Vietnam

Region:
Southeast Asia

Tue Thanh Guildhall Thien Hau Pagoda

The Mazu Temple was built in 1760 by the Cantonese community. In Vietnam, temples are also known as Pagoda. Ho Chi Minh City has about 80% of the Mazu Temples in Vietnam.

District: 5

City:Ho Chi Minh City

Ha Chuong Guildhall Thien Hau Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in the 1809 by immigrants from Zhangzhou.

District: 5

City:Ho Chi Minh City

Quynh Phu Guildhall Hainan Thien Hau Temple

The Mazu Temple was built around 1824 by Hainan immigrants.

District: 5

City:Ho Chi Minh City

Tam Son Guildhall Thien Hau Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in the 19th century around 1839 by Fuzhou immigrants.

District: 5

City:Ho Chi Minh City

Quang Trieu Guildhall Thien Hau Temple

The Mazu Temple was built by the Cantonese community from Guangzhou and Zhaoqing cities of Guangdong province.

District: 1

City:Ho Chi Minh City

On Lang Guildhall Quan Am Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in the 19th century Hokkien immigrants. The temple is delicated to Goddess Guanyin and has a main chamber with an alter to Mazu.

District: 5

City:Ho Chi Minh City

Philipines

Region:
Southeast Asia

Ma-Cho Temple

The Mazu Temple was built in 1977 by Filipino Chinese community with supported from the Toursim minister.

City: San Fernando

Province: La Union

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